Texas Ed: Comments on Education from Texas

July 30, 2006

So what’s the point?

But none of this counts if the parents are the actual teachers and homeschool the children.

Parents should take part in children’s education | The Bryan-College Station Eagle:

Researchers have found that children with involved parents have higher grade point averages and scores on standardized tests, enroll in more challenging academic programs, pass more classes, have better attendance and have better social skills, according to a review published by the Southwest Educational Development Library. A bonus: They also have improved behavior at home and school, the study states.

And then there’s this, another “I can’t believe they said that and I can’t believe they printed it.”

Parents should take part in children’s education | The Bryan-College Station Eagle:

Alma Sotelo, whose son attends Neal Elementary School in Bryan, said she tries to incorporate what her son is learning in class into everyday activities at home. She said her son’s teachers give her advice on things she can do at home with him, like having him help set the table and count the forks to improve his numbers.

Okay, first of all, this is article is supposed to be about parents staying involved their children’s schools as they enter middle school and high school. Is this the best the reporter can do? And she really needed the teacher’s advice to incorporate counting in the home?

Parents should take part in children’s education | The Bryan-College Station Eagle:

Parents should make it a point to show how the child’s schoolwork ties into life at home, said Blanca Quiroz, an assistant professor in the education department at Texas A&M.

Again, this is supposed to be about middle school and high school. I’m sure that most families can incorporate algebra into setting the table or doing laundry. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big supporter of algebra but again, this is an example of reporting the need for one thing and backing it with anecdotes for another. No wonder education research and reporting gets such a bad rap.

Parents should take part in children’s education | The Bryan-College Station Eagle:

“Some of us have the ability to become overly involved. The key is to know the balance,” Walraven said. “[Parents need to know] the difference between being involved and supportive and being over-functioning, where you’ve crawled into your child’s boundaries.

What wonderfully ambiguous eduspeak. So are they talking about parents doing science projects for their kids, OR parents homeschooling their kids so that they don’t have to learn to put up with bullies or drug pushers, OR parents who might dare to suggest to a teacher a different approach that might work better for their child?

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